Making A Long Distance Relationship Work

Long distance is never easy on a relationship. The one person you want to spend your time with and physically be close to is not there.

It’s a lot easier in the modern world, thankfully, to stay connected but it is still very difficult and that shouldn’t be taken for granted.

On the positive side, current technology allows for constant communication. You can text each other all day and catchup on the go via video calls. That certainly makes it a lot easier if you are living in vastly different time zones. However, it can’t make up for that loss of being in the same room physically.

So, how do you make it work? There are a few things you can do to ensure that you give your relationship the best chance of surviving:

Prioritize Each Other

When you’re in a regular relationship, it’s easy to not notice that you’re doing a lot of things without your partner – especially if you live together. This is because their physical presence is felt whenever you are together. When you are going long distance, you need to stick to your commitments to connect.

Create a schedule for how and when you are going to talk. Then, stick to it. You can even come up with a rule that if you break the schedule more than twice in a row, you need to come together and work out why that’s happening. Life gets busy and it’s easy to get caught up in what’s right in front of you and not allow that time for communication with your partner. It’s up to both of you to ensure that doesn’t happen.

One thing to remember when creating your schedule, is to ensure it works for both of you. Take into account how both of you like to communicate, when you are at your best and how you open you are to flexibility in the schedule. This should be a schedule that makes you both happy and comfortable so that one person doesn’t start to resent the other and you always have time for the things you each enjoy, like greyhound bets or going to the gym.

Have A Joint Plan

One of the scariest things about a long-distance relationship is not knowing how it will end. Will they move back? Will you move there? When does the commitment to the new city or country end? These are things that you need to discuss as frankly and openly as possible. It can’t go on forever and both of you need to know how it will likely end with you back together.

The important thing is that you have the same mental image of what the time apart will look like. Sit down together and draw up a timeline that keeps in mind what your ultimate end goal is. If one of you is moving to pave the way for the other to come over later, you need to have a plan for how to achieve that. If one of you is moving away until a job opportunity comes up that is closer to home, you need to have a plan for finding that closer job prospect.